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Jupiter-Comet ImpactStar Chart Options

Asteroids

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Adding Asteroids

Just like adding comets, you can add asteroids into the package if you know the Orbital Elements.

Orbital Elements for some of the brighter asteroids are given in the following list.

ast={{Vesta,2.36151,0.089562,7.1352,0.271593,
315.201,149.919,103.988,3.20},
{Ceres,2.76744,0.076560,10.6,0.214085,
141.462,71.116,80.677,3.34},
{Pallas,2.77033,0.234644,34.8125,0.213751,
127.630,309.700,173.307,4.13},
{Eunomia,2.64270,0.186837,11.7576,0.229420,
197.076,97.481,293.569,5.28},
{Juno,2.66945,0.257119,12.9922,0.225981,
341.381,246.776,170.530,5.33},
{Hygiea,3.13479,0.120719,3.8408,0.177579,
210.768,315.688,283.820,5.43},
{Iris,2.38614,0.228878,5.5126,0.267399,
39.658,144.740,260.090,5.51},
{Hebe,2.42479,0.201743,14.7817,0.261031,
50.414,238.429,139.030,5.71},
{Amphitrite,2.55523,0.071606,6.1107,0.241301,
78.652,63.476,356.625,5.85},
{Psyche,2.92689,0.134497,3.0927,0.196831,
154.590,228.607,150.492,5.90}};

Passing these numbers to SetOrbitalElements is all that is required to add the new objects into the package.

Apply[SetOrbitalElements[#1,
ViewPoint -> Sun,
Date -> {1992,6,27}, TimeZone -> 0,
OrbitalSemiMajorAxis -> #2*AU,
OrbitalEccentricity -> #3,
OrbitalInclination -> #4*Degree,
MeanAnomaly -> #6*Degree,
PerigeeArgument -> #7*Degree,
AscendingLongitude -> #8*Degree]&,
ast, 2]

Of course you can add asteroid at follows:

SetOrbitalElements[Asteroid3753,
ViewPoint -> Sun,
Date -> {1997, 2, 21},
TimeZone -> 0,
OrbitalSemiMajorAxis -> 0.99778030 AU,
OrbitalEccentricity -> 0.51478431,
OrbitalInclination -> 19.812285 Degree,
MeanAnomaly -> 40.048932 Degree,
PerigeeArgument -> 43.640637 Degree,
AscendingLongitude -> 126.373212 Degree];

SetOrbitalElements[Asteroid1993WD,
ViewPoint -> Sun,
Date -> {1997, 2, 21},
TimeZone -> 0,
OrbitalSemiMajorAxis -> 1.00668311 AU,
OrbitalEccentricity -> 0.26661543,
OrbitalInclination -> 63.461332 Degree,
MeanAnomaly -> 70.722091 Degree,
PerigeeArgument -> 132.281816 Degree,
AscendingLongitude -> 56.590687 Degree];

SetOrbitalElements[Eureka,
ViewPoint -> Sun,
Date -> {1997, 6, 1},
TimeZone -> 0,
OrbitalSemiMajorAxis -> 1.52357521 AU,
OrbitalEccentricity -> 0.06468827,
OrbitalInclination -> 20.279376 Degree,
MeanAnomaly -> 181.310603 Degree,
PerigeeArgument -> 95.419461 Degree,
AscendingLongitude -> 245.143523 Degree];

Orbit Plots

First let us see how the orbits of all these asteroids compare with the orbits of the planets.

OrbitPlot[{Mercury,Venus,Earth,
Mars,Jupiter,
Eunomia,Juno,Hygiea,Iris,
Hebe,Amphitrite,Psyche,
Vesta,Ceres,Pallas},
PlotStyleRuleJoin[
Table[{Thickness[0],
RGBColor[1,0,0]}, {5}],
Table[{Thickness[0],
RGBColor[0,1,0]}, {7}],
Table[{Thickness[0],
RGBColor[0,0,1]}, {3}]],
DistanceRule5.5 AU];1;

We note from the above that the asteroids (shown in green and blue) all orbit between Mars and Jupiter (shown as the outer two red orbits). The brightest asteroids (Vesta, Ceres and Pallas) are shown in blue.

Although the graphic shows a nice two-dimensional view of the solar system as seen from above the ecliptic plane, it does not indicate the inclination of the orbits. This is where OrbitPlot3D comes in.

OrbitPlot3D[{Earth,Mars,Jupiter,
Vesta,Ceres,Pallas},
PlotStyleRule{RGBColor[0.2,0.7,1.0],
RGBColor[1.0,0.3,0.3],
RGBColor[0.9,0.8,0.6],
RGBColor[1,1,1],
RGBColor[1,1,1],
RGBColor[1,1,0]},
PlotRegionRule{{-0.4,1.4},{-0.4,1.4}},
BackgroundRuleGrayLevel[0.5],
DistanceRule5.5 AU,
ViewPointRule{1,2,1},
SphericalRegionRuleTrue];1;

This shows that Vesta and Ceres (both shown in white) orbit in approximately the same plane as the planets, but that Pallas (shown in yellow) is in a plane tilted somewhat away from the main plane.

Jupiter-Comet ImpactStar Chart Options



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