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PlanetPlot3DVenusChart

5.3 The RiseSetChart Function

RiseSetChart is useful for determining when a planet is visible above the horizon at night, during the course of a year.

Producing a chart of rising and setting times.

In the graphic, gray areas represent night and green areas show when the object is visible above the horizon during the night. Meridian transits occur on the cyan line. The red line is the local rising time and the blue line is the local setting time. These local times depend on your geographic latitude; this can be changed using SetLocation, or more simply by passing a value for the option GeoLatitude to RiseSetChart.

Focus on the green areas, as they will tell you month by month whether the planet is visible in the evening or morning hours. You can read precise times at the bottom of the graphic.

A RiseSetChart shows the rising and setting times of Mercury during the year 1994, appropriate for an observer situated 35 degrees south of the equator. By focusing on the green areas, you can see that Mercury is visible in the evening just after dusk during late January, late May, and September.

In[17]:=RiseSetChart[Mercury, 1994, GeoLatitude -> -35Degree];

A chart of Jupiter shows the rising and setting times during the year 1994, appropriate for an observer situated 35 degrees north of the equator. By focusing on the green areas, you can see that Jupiter is visible in the evening from about May through October.

In[18]:=RiseSetChart[Jupiter, 1994, GeoLatitude -> 35Degree];

Daylight-saving time can be correctly included, too. The option setting DaylightSaving -> Automatic causes clocks to be shifted one hour forward for the four months over summer. The summer months in the vertical axis are highlighted when daylight-saving time is in effect, and a separate horizontal hour axis, shifted one hour to the left, is given at the bottom.

The default value for the option DaylightSaving is None. In general, you can use DaylightSaving -> {startdate, stopdate} to set the start and stop dates of daylight-saving time. If you use DaylightSaving -> Automatic, the start and stop dates are taken as {{year,5,1}, {year,9,1}} for the northern hemisphere and {{year,11,1}, {year,3,1}} for the southern hemisphere.

Other options include Text->False, which prevents the seasons being printed; and Mesh->True, which draws a monthly and two-hourly mesh. You can use the option AspectRatio to adjust the aspect ratio of the chart.

PlanetPlot3DVenusChart



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