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Documentation / Mathematica / Front End / Menu Commands / Kernel Menu /

Kernel Configuration Options...

FilledSmallSquare Kernel Configuration Options lets you set up connections to a kernel.

FilledSmallSquare When "Append name to In/Out prompts" is checked, the name of the kernel connection is appended to cell labels generated during that connection.

FilledSmallSquare The kernel names that you define here are shown throughout the front end whenever you have a choice of kernels.

To open the subsections below, click the triangle to the left of each heading.

Defining Kernel Connections: General Instructions

FilledSmallSquare When you choose Kernel Configuration Options from the Kernel menu, a dialog box lists the kernel connections already defined. "Local" is the default connection to MathKernel on your local machine.

FilledSmallSquare To define a new kernel:

1. Choose Kernel Configuration Options.

2. Click Add. The configuration dialog box will open to let you define the new connection.

3. Fill in the kernel name at the top of the dialog box.

4. Choose whether to launch the kernel on the local computer or on a remote computer.

5. Give the name of the Kernel Program. On Macintosh or Microsoft Windows, the name is typically "MathKernel". On Unix systems, the name is typically "math", which is the shell script that runs MathKernel.

6. Click OK to save the kernel connection.

Remote Kernel Connections: Microsoft Windows

FilledSmallSquare To set up a connection from a Windows front end to a kernel on a remote machine:

1. Choose Kernel Configurations Options in the Kernel menu.

2. In the dialog box that appears, click Add.

3. Fill out the connection name, which will be the name given in the list of available kernels.

4. Specify that the kernel is on a remote machine.

5. Give the host name of the remote machine.

6. Type your user name for the remote machine.

7. Click OK.

To use the new kernel, go to the Kernel menu and select the new kernel from either the Start Kernel, Default Kernel, or Notebook's Kernel submenu. The front end included in Mathematica Version 4 must be connected to a Version 3 or 4 kernel.

Permission denied

FilledSmallSquare If you followed the preceding instructions and received a warning such as "Permission denied", the remote machine has not accepted you as a valid user. Try the procedure for "Remote kernel setup on a non-trusted host", or contact your network administrator for help.

FilledSmallSquare If a kernel connection fails to start up correctly, the Mathematica front end will treat that connection as idle. If you wish to try opening the connection again, you should first go to the Kernel menu, choose Quit Kernel, and click the name of the idle connection to close it.

Remote kernel setup on a non-trusted host

FilledSmallSquare If the remote computer does not consider your computer a trusted host, you should change the remote kernel configuration to request your password for the remote computer upon kernel startup.

FilledSmallSquare To modify a remote kernel configuration to require entry of a password:

1. In the Kernel Properties dialog for a remote kernel (set up according to the previous instructions), check the box labeled "Request password when connecting".

2. Click OK.

You will now need to enter a password whenever you try to start this remote kernel.

FilledSmallSquare To use a remote kernel that requests a password:

1. Select the remote kernel from either the Start Kernel, Default Kernel, or Notebook's Kernel submenu.

2. If you have selected the remote kernel as the default kernel or as the current notebook's kernel, launch it by entering an expression and pressing ShiftKeyKeyBarEnterKey.

3. As the remote kernel is started up, a Remote Login dialog box will appear. Enter your password for the remote computer in the Password field of the dialog box.

4. Click Connect.

Remote Kernel Connections: Macintosh

Connecting from a Macintosh front end to a Unix Kernel

FilledSmallSquare To establish a remote connection to a Unix kernel, the kernel must be Version 3 or later.

FilledSmallSquare Connecting to a remote Unix kernel via MathLink takes place in two steps. First, the front end prepares itself for an incoming connection, opens a terminal window to the Unix host, and logs onto the remote host (either manually or automatically). Second, the front end uses a terminal window to command the Unix host to launch a kernel and connect back to the front end. Once this second step is complete, the terminal connection is closed.

FilledSmallSquare To define a connection to a remote Unix kernel under the TCP/IP communications protocol:

1. Make sure you have MacTCP installed and configured correctly for your Macintosh.

2. Make sure the VersaTerm Telnet Tool is in the appropriate location in the System Folder. (Dragging the icon to the System Folder will ensure its proper placement automatically.)

3. Make sure you have a Terminal Tool (e.g., TTY Tool or VT100 Tool) in the appropriate location in the System Folder.

4. Select Kernel Configuration Options from the Kernel menu. This brings up a dialog box.

5. Click the Add button. The Kernel Configuration dialog box appears to let you define a new kernel connection.

6. Type a name for the new connection in the text box.

7. Click the radio button labeled "Remote Machine".

8. Make sure that the Kernel program text box reads "math".

9. Edit the login string in the Remote Login text box. (See Entering a login string.)

10. Click the Connection button. A Connection Settings dialog box appears.

11. Select VersaTerm Telnet Tool from the pop-up menu at the top of the dialog box.

12. In the text box, type the name or IP address of the Unix host on which the kernel will run. For more information, see the documentation for the VersaTerm Telnet Tool.

13. Click OK to activate the selected communications settings. The Communications Settings dialog box disappears and you are returned to the Kernel Configuration dialog box.

14. Click the Terminal button. A Terminal Settings dialog box appears that lets you specify what kind of terminal emulation your Macintosh will use when communicating with the remote computer.

15. Select the desired terminal emulation and specify any desired options in the dialog box. For more information, see the documentation for the Terminal Tool.

16. Click OK to activate the selected terminal settings. The Terminal Settings dialog box disappears and you are returned to the Kernel Configuration dialog box.

17. Click OK to save the kernel connection. The Kernel Configuration dialog box disappears and you are returned to the list of kernel connections. If you are done, click OK again.

Entering a login string

FilledSmallSquare The login string lets the remote kernel start automatically so you don't have to enter your login every time you start the remote kernel. A typical login string for a remote Unix computer looks like this:

^:username\r^:password\r^>

FilledSmallSquare The characters in this login string are interpreted by the front end as follows.

FilledSmallSquare On typical Unix systems, the colon (:) ends the Unix login prompts login: and password:and the greater than character (>) is the command-line prompt. You might need to make changes as appropriate for your particular system.

FilledSmallSquare The terms username and password should be replaced by your login name and password for the remote computer.

FilledSmallSquare Omitting portions (or all) of the login string requires you to enter the corresponding text each time you start the remote kernel. The login string ^:username\r^:^>, for example, omits the password, requiring you to enter it each time the remote kernel is started.

Connecting from a Macintosh front end to a kernel on another Macintosh

FilledSmallSquare Mathematica can connect the Macintosh front end to one or more kernels on remote Macintosh computers on the same network. To make such a connection, program linking must be enabled on the remote machine.

FilledSmallSquare If guests are not allowed to link programs, a user password will have to be entered before the link can be made.

FilledSmallSquare To set up a connection to a kernel on another Macintosh:

1. Run MathKernel on the remote Macintosh.

2. At the In[1]:= prompt, enter the MathLink command $ParentLink=LinkOpen[LinkMode->Listen].

3. Launch the front end on the local Macintosh.

4. Choose Kernel Configuration Options in the Kernel menu. A dialog box appears listing the names of kernel connections.

5. Click Add. The Kernel Configuration dialog box appears to let you define a kernel connection.

6. Click the Advanced Options radio button.

7. Enter -LinkMode Connect in the Arguments to MLOpen text box. (Delete any other options in this text box.)

8. Delete the text in the Communications Toolbox Login text box. (This login string is intended for remote Unix connections.)

9. Click OK to save the kernel connection.

10. Launch the new kernel by choosing it in the Start Kernel submenu of the Kernel menu. A program communication browser should appear.

11. Click the zone of the remote Macintosh; click the computer's name; click the kernel name; then click OK.