$ProcessorCount

$ProcessorCount

gives the number of processor cores available on the computer system on which the Wolfram System is being run.

Details

Examples

open allclose all

Basic Examples  (1)

Applications  (2)

By default, as many parallel kernels are launched as there are processor cores:

You can change $ProcessorCount in a new session to simulate a multicore computer:

Possible Issues  (2)

No kernels are launched by default on a single-core computer:

Specify the number of desired kernels to launch them anyway:

Changing $ProcessorCount takes effect only if it happens before using any parallel commands:

You can always launch the desired number of kernels explicitly:

Wolfram Research (2008), $ProcessorCount, Wolfram Language function, https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/$ProcessorCount.html.

Text

Wolfram Research (2008), $ProcessorCount, Wolfram Language function, https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/$ProcessorCount.html.

BibTeX

@misc{reference.wolfram_2020_$processorcount, author="Wolfram Research", title="{$ProcessorCount}", year="2008", howpublished="\url{https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/$ProcessorCount.html}", note=[Accessed: 16-January-2021 ]}

BibLaTeX

@online{reference.wolfram_2020_$processorcount, organization={Wolfram Research}, title={$ProcessorCount}, year={2008}, url={https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/$ProcessorCount.html}, note=[Accessed: 16-January-2021 ]}

CMS

Wolfram Language. 2008. "$ProcessorCount." Wolfram Language & System Documentation Center. Wolfram Research. https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/$ProcessorCount.html.

APA

Wolfram Language. (2008). $ProcessorCount. Wolfram Language & System Documentation Center. Retrieved from https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/$ProcessorCount.html