WOLFRAM SYSTEMMODELER

LimPID

P, PI, PD, and PID controller with limited output, anti-windup compensation and setpoint weighting

Diagram

Wolfram Language

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SystemModel["Modelica.Blocks.Continuous.LimPID"]
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Information

This information is part of the Modelica Standard Library maintained by the Modelica Association.

Via parameter controllerType either P, PI, PD, or PID can be selected. If, e.g., PI is selected, all components belonging to the D-part are removed from the block (via conditional declarations). The example model Modelica.Blocks.Examples.PID_Controller demonstrates the usage of this controller. Several practical aspects of PID controller design are incorporated according to chapter 3 of the book:

Åström K.J., and Hägglund T.:
PID Controllers: Theory, Design, and Tuning. Instrument Society of America, 2nd edition, 1995.

Besides the additive proportional, integral and derivative part of this controller, the following features are present:

  • The output of this controller is limited. If the controller is in its limits, anti-windup compensation is activated to drive the integrator state to zero.
  • The high-frequency gain of the derivative part is limited to avoid excessive amplification of measurement noise.
  • Setpoint weighting is present, which allows to weight the setpoint in the proportional and the derivative part independently from the measurement. The controller will respond to load disturbances and measurement noise independently of this setting (parameters wp, wd). However, setpoint changes will depend on this setting. For example, it is useful to set the setpoint weight wd for the derivative part to zero, if steps may occur in the setpoint signal.

The parameters of the controller can be manually adjusted by performing simulations of the closed loop system (= controller + plant connected together) and using the following strategy:

  1. Set very large limits, e.g., yMax = Modelica.Constants.inf
  2. Select a P-controller and manually enlarge parameter k (the total gain of the controller) until the closed-loop response cannot be improved any more.
  3. Select a PI-controller and manually adjust parameters k and Ti (the time constant of the integrator). The first value of Ti can be selected, such that it is in the order of the time constant of the oscillations occurring with the P-controller. If, e.g., vibrations in the order of T=10 ms occur in the previous step, start with Ti=0.01 s.
  4. If you want to make the reaction of the control loop faster (but probably less robust against disturbances and measurement noise) select a PID-Controller and manually adjust parameters k, Ti, Td (time constant of derivative block).
  5. Set the limits yMax and yMin according to your specification.
  6. Perform simulations such that the output of the PID controller goes in its limits. Tune Ni (Ni*Ti is the time constant of the anti-windup compensation) such that the input to the limiter block (= limiter.u) goes quickly enough back to its limits. If Ni is decreased, this happens faster. If Ni=infinity, the anti-windup compensation is switched off and the controller works bad.

Initialization

This block can be initialized in different ways controlled by parameter initType. The possible values of initType are defined in Modelica.Blocks.Types.InitPID. This type is identical to Types.Init, with the only exception that the additional option DoNotUse_InitialIntegratorState is added for backward compatibility reasons (= integrator is initialized with InitialState whereas differential part is initialized with NoInit which was the initialization in version 2.2 of the Modelica standard library).

Based on the setting of initType, the integrator (I) and derivative (D) blocks inside the PID controller are initialized according to the following table:

initType I.initType D.initType
NoInit NoInit NoInit
SteadyState SteadyState SteadyState
InitialState InitialState InitialState
InitialOutput
and initial equation: y = y_start
NoInit SteadyState
DoNotUse_InitialIntegratorState InitialState NoInit

In many cases, the most useful initial condition is SteadyState because initial transients are then no longer present. If initType = InitPID.SteadyState, then in some cases difficulties might occur. The reason is the equation of the integrator:

   der(y) = k*u;

The steady state equation "der(x)=0" leads to the condition that the input u to the integrator is zero. If the input u is already (directly or indirectly) defined by another initial condition, then the initialization problem is singular (has none or infinitely many solutions). This situation occurs often for mechanical systems, where, e.g., u = desiredSpeed - measuredSpeed and since speed is both a state and a derivative, it is natural to initialize it with zero. As sketched this is, however, not possible. The solution is to not initialize u_m or the variable that is used to compute u_m by an algebraic equation.

If parameter limitAtInit = false, the limits at the output of this controller block are removed from the initialization problem which leads to a much simpler equation system. After initialization has been performed, it is checked via an assert whether the output is in the defined limits. For backward compatibility reasons limitAtInit = true. In most cases it is best to use limitAtInit = false.

Connectors (3)

u_s

Type: RealInput

Description: Connector of setpoint input signal

u_m

Type: RealInput

Description: Connector of measurement input signal

y

Type: RealOutput

Description: Connector of actuator output signal

Parameters (18)

controllerType

Value: .Modelica.Blocks.Types.SimpleController.PID

Type: SimpleController

Description: Type of controller

k

Value: 1

Type: Real ()

Description: Gain of controller

Ti

Value: 0.5

Type: Time (s)

Description: Time constant of Integrator block

Td

Value: 0.1

Type: Time (s)

Description: Time constant of Derivative block

yMax

Value:

Type: Real

Description: Upper limit of output

yMin

Value: -yMax

Type: Real

Description: Lower limit of output

wp

Value: 1

Type: Real

Description: Set-point weight for Proportional block (0..1)

wd

Value: 0

Type: Real

Description: Set-point weight for Derivative block (0..1)

Ni

Value: 0.9

Type: Real

Description: Ni*Ti is time constant of anti-windup compensation

Nd

Value: 10

Type: Real

Description: The higher Nd, the more ideal the derivative block

initType

Value: .Modelica.Blocks.Types.InitPID.DoNotUse_InitialIntegratorState

Type: InitPID

Description: Type of initialization (1: no init, 2: steady state, 3: initial state, 4: initial output)

limitsAtInit

Value: true

Type: Boolean

Description: = false, if limits are ignored during initialization

xi_start

Value: 0

Type: Real

Description: Initial or guess value value for integrator output (= integrator state)

xd_start

Value: 0

Type: Real

Description: Initial or guess value for state of derivative block

y_start

Value: 0

Type: Real

Description: Initial value of output

strict

Value: false

Type: Boolean

Description: = true, if strict limits with noEvent(..)

with_I

Value: controllerType == SimpleController.PI or controllerType == SimpleController.PID

Type: Boolean

Description:

with_D

Value: controllerType == SimpleController.PD or controllerType == SimpleController.PID

Type: Boolean

Description:

Components (13)

addP

Type: Add

Description:

addD

Type: Add

Description:

P

Type: Gain

Description:

I

Type: Integrator

Description:

D

Type: Derivative

Description:

gainPID

Type: Gain

Description:

addPID

Type: Add3

Description:

addI

Type: Add3

Description:

addSat

Type: Add

Description:

gainTrack

Type: Gain

Description:

limiter

Type: Limiter

Description:

Dzero

Type: Constant

Description:

Izero

Type: Constant

Description:

Used in Examples (3)

PID_Controller

Demonstrates the usage of a Continuous.LimPID controller

SMEE_LoadDump

Test example: ElectricalExcitedSynchronousInductionMachine with voltage controller

SMEE_Rectifier

Test example: ElectricalExcitedSynchronousInductionMachine with rectifier